18
Feb
10

Sound Table 2/18/10 – Meth Ghost Rae, Jake One (Minus Freeway), Rob Swift, DJ Babu & More

Wu-Massacre

Haven’t done a Sound Table in a minute, but you know the deal. Get ’em while they’re hot!

Download: Meth, Ghost & Rae – Our Dreams (Right Click – Save As) | Purchase: Pre-Order Meth, Ghost & Rae’s upcoming album Wu Massacre.. Get a sneak peak at HHIR. Drops March 30th!

Download: Freeway & Jake One – Stimulus Package (Instrumentals) (MegaUpload) | Purchase:  Freeway & Jake One – Stimulus Package

Download: DJ Babu – The Beat Tape Vol 2 | Purchase: DJ Babu – The Beat Tape Vol 2

Download: Rob Swift – “The Architect” | PurchaseRob Swift – The Architect

Download: Mainframe – e.q.e.p.

Download: Full Crate & Mar – Conversations With Her EP

Watch, Laugh, Rewind:

 

“I Am A Motherfucker”.. For the win!

16
Feb
10

DJ King Flow & DJ PLK To Drop An Instrumental Album Every 2 Weeks

Tasty Beatz Vol 2

Two French DJ’s/producers have their sights set on a seemingly arduous task – to drop approximately 23 albums by the end of the year.

Insanity? High expectations? An impossibilityMaybe, but King Flow & PLK along with their label Universal Indie Records are planning to drop an instrumental album every 2 weeks in 2010 for what could be an epic effort if they rise to the occasion.

The 16- and 17-year olds, respectively, cut the first in their new series dubbed Tasty Beatz Vol 2 (where’s Vol 1 at? Hmmm..) this weekend, available for a recession-friendly free.99. Though I was skeptical before I listened, these young’ns are pretty decent behind the boards as they craft some soulful, quality jazz-hop.

I’m intrigued to see how they progress with this concept, so I’ll be keeping an eye on my inbox each and every fortnight (yes, it’s a word Einstein). I’ll be sure to share, so please feel free to leave some feedback on how you feel about these jawns.

Check the link below to download. Big thanks to Jenny at Universal Indie for the heads up, Enjoy!

Download: DJ King Flow & DJ PLK – Tasty Beatz Vol 2

13
Feb
10

Not Your Average Valentine’s Day-Themed Mixes.. DJ Matt Cali & Russel Fong | Cosmo Baker

Whether or not you celebrate the holiday dedicated to men attempting to impress women who possess unrealistic expectations* St. Valentine, anyone can appreciate some fresh vibes.

First up is a spankin’ new mix from some of HTT‘s good friends, turntable master Matt Cali and music historian Russel Fong. I’ll let Cali tell it:

… If you are looking for a sappy slow jam mixtape, you are obviously unfamiliar with the way these two get down (pause). Luvsick is a perfect blend of all types of love songs ranging from REO Speedwagon, Radiohead, Teddy Pendergrass, to the likes of Slum Village, Jodeci and Lil Wayne. And like all Russel Fong and Matt Cali presentations, it is mixed in true school turntable fashion.

Now that sounds dope, don’t it?

For the traditionalists, expert create-digger Cosmo Baker splices soul and classic R&B on his Valentine’s Roll Mix. Featuring songs by Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell, Stevie Wonder, Donny Hathaway, Al Green, Aretha Franklin, and of course Prince, this will help the fellas get their ladies in that special mood.

Bump these while you do whatever it is you do this weekend. Don’t forget guys – wrap it up be safe.

Shouts to Russel & Matt, plus the gracious homie Gotty & Co at TSS for the second jawn. Enjoy!

*I keed, I keed. Y’all lovers do y’all thang.

 

Luvsick

Download: DJ Matt Cali & Russel Fong – Luvsick

Cosmo Baker - Valentine's Roll Mix

Download: Cosmo Baker – Valentine’s Roll Mix

Track List:

The Friends Of Distinction “Circles”
Aretha Franklin “Call Me”
Donny Hathaway “I Love You More Than You’ll Ever Know”
Rick James “Fire & Desire” feat. Teena Marie
Curtis Mayfield “Sweet Exorcist”
James Brown “That’s My Desire”
Otis Redding “That’s How Strong My Love Is”
Sam Cooke “Bring It On Home To Me”
Irma Thomas “Ruler Of My Heart”
Al Green “Simply Beautiful”
The Isley Brothers “Voyage To Atlantis”
George Harrison “I’ll Take You Anytime”
Stevie Wonder “I Believe (When I Fall In Love)”
Patrice Rushen “Settle For My Love”
Prince “Adore”
Quincy Jones “The Secret Garden (Sweet Seduction Suite)”
Rene & Angela “Your Smile” (12? Version)
The Isley Brothers “Fire And Rain”
The Smith Connection “Rainy Days And Mondays”
Darondo “Listen To My Song”
The Beach Boys “Forever”
Rita Wright “I Can’t Give Back The Love I Feel For You”
Black Ivory “Got To Be There”
Brenda Russell “So Good, So Right”
Bonnie Pointer “More And More”
David Bowie “Can You Hear Me”
Earth, Wind And Fire “Can’t Hide Love”
The Rolling Stones “Let It Loose”
East Of Underground “I Love You For All Seasons”
Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell “If This World Were Mine”
The Delfonics “Walk Right Up To The Sun”
New Birth “You Are What I’m All About”
Steely Dan “Any Major Dude”
Bill Withers “Can We Pretend”

07
Feb
10

Happy Birthday, Dilla!

 Dilla

Happy Birthday, Dilla!

Tribute post & downloads coming soon..

07
Feb
10

A Tribute To A True Revolutionary – Bob Marley (Article, Albums & Downloads)

R.I.P.

A Tribute to a True Revolutionary

Originally published February 2007, © Rutgers University, Daily TargumInside Beat

Bob Marley’s genius extended far beyond music. On his 65th birthday, we celebrate..

Words can hardly express the significance of Bob Marley’s influence nor can they begin to describe the impact of his life that remains over 25 years after his passing.  The reggae superstar used music to unify, uplift, and inspire an entire generation.  His music was simple yet poignant; it transcended the barriers of race, class structure, and even language.  No other recording artist to date has been able to secure international stardom while at the same time remaining loyal to a straightforward mission of equality, peace, and love.

 Jamaican Roots

Get up, stand up/ Stand up for your rights
Get up, stand up/ Don’t give up the fight

-“Get Up, Stand Up,” 1973

Born Robert Nesta Marley on February 6, 1945 in Saint Ann, Jamaica to a white father and black mother, he was challenged from day one.  His father Norval Marley, a quartermaster in the British navy and wealthy landowner, rarely saw his son and left him in the sole care of his mother, Cedella Booker.  Marley experienced poverty and racial prejudice (since he was biracial) as he grew up in Trenchtown, a slummy village in Kingston, the capital of Jamaica.  Inhabitants of Trenchtown were viewed as neglected by Jamaican society.  Although Marley garnered the nickname “Tuff Gong” from friends due to his physical strength, the consciousness he gained shaped his character and would ultimately guide his lifelong energy.

After meeting a fellow street youth named Neville O’Riley Livingston, or “Bunny,” Marley became interested in music.  He and Bunny tuned into American radio, which exposed them to acts like Ray Charles and Curtis Mayfield, and followed the emerging Jamaican R&B scene.  Marley dropped out of school at 14 and, although he took up an apprenticeship with a welder, his true life passion was to make music.

In pursuit of his dream, Marley began practicing and attending informal sessions run by a famous Jamaican singer named Joe Higgs.  After impressing a local entrepreneur named Leslie Kong with his vocal ability, Marley wrote and recorded his first songs, “Judge Not,” “Terror,” and “One Cup of Coffee,” which marked the start of an extraordinary musical vision.

Rude Boy Wailin’

One good thing about music
When it hits, you feel no pain

-“Trenchtown Rock,” 1973

When his solo tracks received little airplay on Jamaican radio, Marley decided he could gain more exposure in a group.  Along with Bunny and another aspiring musician named Peter McIntosh whom Marley met during Higgs’ jam sessions in addition to a few backup singers, Marley formed The Wailers in 1963.  The group’s first single, “Simmer Down,” climbed to No. 1 on the Jamaican charts in early 1964 and established The Wailers’ unique reggae sound, a combination of tough street rhythm and urban vigor, on the Jamaican scene.

As The Wailers gained a national reputation, Marley’s mother resided in Delaware and had saved up enough money to fly her son to America.  In 1966, the group faced adversity and all but Marley, Bunny and McIntosh dropped out.  At the same time, Marley married Rita Anderson and reunited with his mother in America.  His stay in the States was brief, just long enough to gather finances needed to continue his passion, and Marley returned to Jamaica in October 1966.

R.I.P.

Rastaman Vibration

I’m a living man, I’ve got work to do
If you’re not happy, then you must be blue

-“Soul Rebel,” 1970 

Upon his return to home soil, Marley became increasingly attracted to the growing Rastafarian movement.  The Ethiopian Emperor, Haile Selassie, visited Jamaica while Marley was gone and inspired this religious development.  Rita Marley saw Selassie and converted to Rastafarianism, which Bob would soon adopt as well.  This sentiment was echoed throughout his music – the Wailers’ style drifted away from its gritty street roots to spirituality and social awareness.  This conflicted with the vision of their record label Coxsone Dodd, so the group departed to record with innovative reggae producer Lee “Scratch” Perry

During the Perry sessions, the group recorded reggae classics such as “Soul Rebel” and “400 Years.”  Two of Perry’s studio musicians, Aston “Family Man” Barrett and his brother Carlton then joined The Wailers.  The group released several albums with Perry, including Soul Rebel and Soul Revolution.  By the early 1970s, Jamaica had fully embraced their ground-breaking sound.  It was perfect timing to expand to an international audience.

The World Catches Fire

What we need is love, to guide and protect us on
If you hope good down from above, help the weak if you are strong

-“No More Trouble,” 1973 

The Wailers pursued an invitation to a London-based label in 1971, but were dropped before even releasing a single.  In desperation, Marley approached Island Records founder Chris Blackwell, who was instrumental in exposing Europe to Jamaican reggae.  Blackwell offered The Wailers a record deal with Island, which gave them access to state-of-the-art recording facilities that no other reggae band had ever used before.

The result was the group’s 1973 major label debut Catch a Fire, an international hit album and the most innovative reggae composition of its time.  Catch a Fire addressed social and political topics with a captivating optimism – tracks like “Concrete Jungle” and “No More Trouble” embodied Marley’s view that all people could rise above struggle.  The album’s biggest hit was “Stir It Up,” a sensual love song where Bob’s vocals gently soothed the listener.  Catch a Fire began Marley’s successful tenure on Island and catapulted him to international star statusn but led to another identity change for The Wailers.

One Love

One love, one heart
Let’s get together and feel all right

-“One Love / People Get Ready,” 1977

After short tours throughout Europe and the United States, The Wailers went back to the studio to release Burnin’, an LP that included re-recordings of older songs in addition to new hits like “Get Up, Stand Up” and “I Shot The Sheriff.” Epic rock guitarist Eric Clapton’s version of the latter made it to the top of U.S. singles charts and increased Marley’s widespread fame.

Shortly after Burnin’, Bunny and McIntosh left to pursue solo careers.  Now known as Bob Marley & The Wailers and equipped with a female trio of backup singers called the I-Threes that included Rita Marley, the group released Natty Dread in February of 1975.  “Revolution,” “Them Belly Full (But We Hungry),”and “No Woman, No Cry,” the first hit single outside of Bob’s homeland, highlighted an album that showcased Marley’s committed stance of continuously revealing social inequality. 

The follow-up album, 1976’s Rastaman Vibration, experienced success in the U.S. with “Who The Cap Fit” and “War,” for which Marley borrowed words from a speech by Emperor SelassieMarley’s following among youth in Jamaica was widening, however he would soon be the target of a serious attack.

R.I.P.

Movement of Jah People

Open your eyes, look within
Are you satisfied with the life you’re livin’?

-“Exodus,” 1977

As Marley’s position as an international music star progressed, his political influence increased tenfold.  Each time the group went on tour, their message spread quicker than wild fire throughout impoverished Jamaican youth and international audiences alike. 

Although fans idolized the musician, some individuals viewed him as a threat.  In late 1976, as he prepared for a free concert organized by Jamaica’s Prime Minister Michael Manley, unidentified gunmen assaulted and wounded Marley, Rita, and their manager Don Taylor inside the musician’s home.  It is thought that the confrontation was politically-motivated; they recovered quickly and performed as scheduled despite the scare.

In early 1977, Marley departed to England to record two of his most highly-praised albums, Exodus and Kaya.  The former stayed on U.K. charts for over a year and peaked at #20 on U.S. pop charts on the strength of top-selling hits in “Jamming,” “One Love / People Get Ready,” and “Waiting In Vain” in addition to feel-good melodies in “Three Little Birds” and “Natural Mystic.”  The latter focused more on reggae ballads including “Satisfy My Soul” and “Is This Love,” which offered a glimpse into the singer’s more intimate side. 

TIME magazine referred to Exodus as the best album of the 20th century in 1998, and many critics believe it to be the climax of Marley’s career.  In 1978, at the “One Love Peace Concert” in Jamaica, Marley’s impact became clearly evident as he united leaders from the two rival political parties, Prime Minister Manley and Leader of the Opposition Edward Seaga, onstage to embrace in a handshake.  Marley had fully recovered from the attack and accomplished what no other artist had ever done – used music to successfully resolve political differences.

Uprising for Survival

Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery
None but ourselves can free our minds

-“Redemption Song,” 1980

Marley’s final two albums, Survival and Uprising, contrasted in meaning but proved that international achievements were never more important than his message behind the music.  1979’s Survival was fierce and political while 1980’s Uprising was intensely spiritual.  Inspired by a visit to Africa, Survival begged the continent to unify on “Zimbabwe,” “So Much Trouble In The World,” and “Africa Unite.” 

A stop in Ethiopia led to Uprising, a very personal and religious album where Marley’s lyrics reflected his spiritual journey on the worldwide hit “Could You Be Loved” and the acoustic masterpiece “Redemption Song.”  The album appeared on international music charts, acted as motivation for a major European tour, and also led to plans for an American tour with Stevie WonderMarley started the American tour at Madison Square Garden, but fell seriously ill after only two performances.

A toe injury suffered three years earlier in England caused his illness.  Due to his Rastafarian beliefs, Marley refused to have his toe amputated when it became infected and, soon thereafter, cancerous.  As the cancer spread throughout his body, Marley struggled to survive using non-toxic medication but the disease would prove to be overwhelming.  On his way back to Jamaica, Marley passed away in Miami on May 11, 1981 at the age of 36.  His final words were simply, “Money can’t buy life.”

The Legend Lives On

Good friends we’ve had
Oh, good friends we’ve lost along the way

In this great future, you can’t forget your past
So dry your tears, I say

-““No Woman, No Cry”,” 1975

Though his human voice has been forever silenced, Bob Marley’s legacy remains fully intact and has influenced a generation of music enthusiasts to continue the spread of his message.  He was inducted into the Rock and Rock Hall of Fame in 1994 and posthumously received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2001. 

Still, it is the continuing popularity of his music that conveys Marley’s ideas of equality, unity, human rights, and spiritual encouragement.  There are countless compilation albums dedicated to spreading the rhythmic reggae that flowed from his soul.  He never wallowed in self-pity, instead opting to use his experience to expose the world to the reality of life in Third World nations like Jamaica.  “Marley wasn’t singing about how peace could come easily to the world but rather about how hell on earth comes too easily to too many,” Rolling Stone Magazine once wrote.

Marley spoke for the underrepresented, unfortunate, and impoverished.  His music was meant not just to understand but also to uplift, not just to inform but also to involve, and not just to symbolize but also to salvage.  Even in death, Bob Marley remained true to his beliefs and passion.  It is for these reasons that mere words could never pay tribute to the legend nor entirely embody the meaning for which he lived.

R.I.P.

 R.I.P. Robert Nesta Marley, February 6, 1945 – May 11, 1981

Studio Albums:

The Wailing Wailers (1965) [Purchase] | Soul Rebels (1970) | Soul Revolution (1971) | Burnin’ (1973) | Catch a Fire (1973) | Natty Dread (1974) | Rastaman Vibration (1976) | Exodus (1977) | Kaya (1978) | Survival (1979) | Uprising  (1980)

Select Compilations:

Best Of | Songs of Freedom (1992) [Purchase] | Collectorama: The Kingston Years (2008) | One Love at Studio One (1964-66) [Purchase] | Legend (1984) [Purchase]

Select Rarities & Remixes:

Wail ‘n Soul’m Singles (2005) [Purchase] | Dreams of Freedom: Ambient Translations of Bob Marley in Dub (1997) | Bob Marley & Friends – Chant Down Babylon (1999) [Purchase] | J. Period & K’naan Present – The Messengers: Bob Marley

Select Live Performances:

Live in Kingston, Jamaica with Stevie Wonder (1975) | Live! – 1975 [Purchase] | Live in Sausalito, CA 10/31/1973

Interview:

Marley Speaks (From the book Marley Legend)

R.I.P.

05
Feb
10

Album Review: Styles P & DJ Green Lantern – The Green Ghost Project

Green Ghost Project

Styles P & DJ Green Lantern – The Green Ghost Project [MP3 Download]

Record Label: Invasion Music Group

Reviewed by Mookie

(Dom’s note: We’re now collectively known as the Most Hated by one of these guys.. If you can’t stand the heat, get yo’ stankin’ ass out my kitchen!)

When you think of Yonkers-born emcee Styles P, you probably picture him as one of the frontmen of hardcore rap group The LOX. “The Ghost” has also built up a respectable solo discography over the years, with The Green Ghost Project as his newest album. Along with a mob of guest artists and producers, DJ Green Lantern and Styles linked up to create what they call a “monster” of a project. 

The Green Lantern-produced “Nothing To Lose” opens the album up with an abrupt banger. Turn this one up, it’s bass-heavy with a light accent that makes the beat just memorable enough to shine without overshadowing Styles’ vivid quotables.  

An impressive Slick Rick-sampling instrumental by Alchemist ensues on “Make Millions From Entertainment,” although the lyrical effort from Styles P didn’t quite match up. The dark, erie beat on “Time Will Tell” emphasizes Raekwon‘s stand-out feature instead. 

Unfortunately, not all of the production was up to par. “Bang Time” obnoxiously overuses an M.O.P. sample, diminishing its replay value and casting away an otherwise satisfactory feature while “Invasion” sours a Jadakiss appearance with a mundane beat and an out-of-place hook from Junior Reid

Styles has never really been known for his lyrical superiority, and nothing changes here. Most of the verses coil around the main subject matter: money. Although he does branch out occasionally into the realm of prison time (“Send A Kite”) or reminiscence (“Born In These Streets”). 

Still, poor production and low replay value plague nearly this entire project. No more than 4 of the 15 songs are worth multiple spins for anyone outside of Styles P fanatics. Although those few joints may be good, it’s not worth buying the entire album just for the sake of listening to them because it should have been a mixtape – at least the musical quality is reflective of one.

04
Feb
10

Get Ready For (a) Massive Attack..

Massive Attack

As the trip-hop pioneers will be unveiling their 5th album Heligoland next week, the world prepares their ears for another Massive Attack of audio goodness.

It’s been seven long years since Robert “3D” Del Naja & Grant “Daddy G” Marshall released their most recent studio project 100th Window. After touring, film soundtrack appearances and a series of charity events, the UK duo will finally bless us with yet another electronic opus.

Heligoland features vocals from long-time collaborator Horace Andy in addition to Tunde Adebimpe (TV on the Radio), Martina Topley-Bird (Tricky), and Guy Garvey (Elbow) among others, over thumping drums and lush, electro-hop symphonies.

Fans can pre-order Massive Attack’s new album on Amazon, and catch a preview by either downloading their recent podcast with BBC 6 Music’s Steve Lamacq or the bolded tracks below. Prepare yourselves, Enjoy!

Heligoland

Pre-Order on Amazon: Massive Attack – Heligoland [MP3 Download]

Download: BBC 6 Music – 2/1/10 Massive Attack Podcast with Steve Lamacq (Right click – Save As) [Update: Unavailable outside the UK. Sorry y’all.]

Track List (Preview Bolded Tracks):

1. Pray for Rain (feat. Tunde Adebimpe) 6:44
2. Babel (feat. Martina Topley-Bird) 5:19
3. Splitting The Atom (feat. Horace Andy) 5:16
4. Girl I Love You (feat. Horace Andy) 5:26
5. Psyche (feat. Martina Topley-Bird) 3:24
6. Flat of the Blade (feat. Guy Garvey) 5:30
7. Paradise Circus (feat. Hope Sandoval) 4:57
8. Rush Minute 4:51
9. Saturday Come Slow (feat. Damon Albarn) 3:43
10. Atlas Air 7:48





Corleone, Hold the Throne

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